Literary Fiction

Literary Fiction

Are you the type of person that needs a lot of depth in your ebooks?  Are you interested in contemplating significant social or political issues while you enjoy fiction?  Then, you've come to the right place.  We feature bestselling authors of ebooks in our Literary Fiction genre, and they bring their epic works to you either free or discounted.  

 

Definition of the "Literary Fiction Genre": A central aspect of the Literary Fiction genre of ebooks is that they do not focus on plot as much a they focus on theme.  Thus, commentary on a social issue, or the growth of a character from a human aspect during a story are the central parts of Literary Fiction ebooks.  This, naturally, stands in stark contrast to "mainstream" fiction, which focuses more on plot and how the plot is driven by action or tension.  Other important aspects of Literary Fiction ebooks is that their pace tends to be slower, and due to the substance they address, they are "darker" or "heavier" than fiction ebooks in other genres.

 

Some examples of bestselling ebooks in the Literary Fiction genre are J.D. Salinger (The Catcher in the Rye), Aldous Hudley (Brave New World), Anthony Doerr (All the Light We Cannot See), Catherine Ryan Hyde (When I Found You) and Kimberly McCreight (Reconstructing Amelia: A Novel).

Queenie's Teapot: A Political Satire (Queenie Chronicles Book 1)

by Carolyn Steele

A post-Brexit, post-Trump romp through the world of what-if...

In a world where democracy has been declared no longer fit for purpose, a cohort of randomly selected British Republic citizens receive their call to serve in parliament. As the strangers gather to learn their tasks for the next three years, the Cabinet Support Team try to fit jobs to skills—but Queenie can’t do nuffin’. Naturally she becomes head of state. Together the new government muddles through, tackling unrest on the streets and a spot of global bioterrorism in addition to their own journeys of self-discovery.

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The Impact of a Single Event

by R. L. Prendergast

A terrible car accident occurs. Richard and Sonia, a couple with a crumbling marriage, stop to help the critically injured victims. In the process, they find a 140-year-old journal by the side of the road. Six different people have written in the journal. Though the entries span three centuries, the writers share a quest: the search for meaning in their lives. These stories take Richard and Sonia on a personal and historic journey: across Canada to the jungles of India and back to the Canadian Rocky Mountains, where a final mystery awaits.

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Sweet Tea Tuesdays

by Ashley Farley

Three best friends met every Tuesday for twenty-six years. And then they stopped.

From the author of the bestselling Sweeney Sisters Series comes a novel of friendship, family, and hope.

When new next-door neighbors Georgia, Midge, and Lula first assembled on Georgia’s porch in Charleston for sweet tea, they couldn’t have known their gathering was the beginning of a treasured tradition. For twenty-six years they have met on Tuesdays at four o’clock, watching the seasons change and their children grow up, supporting each other in good times and in bad. With their ambitions as different as their personalities, these best friends anticipate many more years of tea time. And then, one Tuesday, Georgia shares news that brings their long-standing social hour to an abrupt halt. And that’s only the beginning as unraveling secrets threaten to alter their friendship forever.

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The Narrow Road to the Deep North

by Richard Flanagan

Winner of the Man Booker Prize

Nothing since Cormac McCarthy’s The Road has shaken me like this.” —The Washington Post

From the author of the acclaimed Gould’s Book of Fish, a magisterial novel of love and war that traces the life of one man from World War II to the present.
 
August, 1943: Australian surgeon Dorrigo Evans is haunted by his affair with his uncle’s young wife two years earlier. His life, in a brutal Japanese POW camp on the Thai-Burma Death Railway, is a daily struggle to save the men under his command. Until he receives a letter that will change him forever.
 
A savagely beautiful novel about the many forms of good and evil, of truth and transcendence, as one man comes of age, prospers, only to discover all that he has lost.

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The Buried Book

by D. M. Pulley

 

When Althea Leary abandons her nine-year-old son, Jasper, he’s left on his uncle’s farm with nothing but a change of clothes and a Bible.

It’s 1952, and Jasper isn’t allowed to ask questions or make a fuss. He’s lucky to even have a home and must keep his mouth shut and his ears open to stay in his uncle’s good graces. No one knows where his mother went or whether she’s coming back. Desperate to see her again, he must take matters into his own hands. From the farm, he embarks on a treacherous search that will take him to the squalid hideaways of Detroit and back again, through tawdry taverns, peep shows, and gambling houses.

As he’s drawn deeper into an adult world of corruption, scandal, and murder, Jasper uncovers the shocking past still chasing his mother—and now it’s chasing him too.

 

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The History of Aythan Waring: A historical family saga

by Violet Jacobs

'A strong story [...] a dramatic close' - The Spectator

“For God’s sake, Hester, don’t have hysterics here!” he cried.
She shook as though blown by some tempest of wind. A kind of dumb paroxysm swept over her. He drew her on towards the house. Within sight of its walls he relaxed his hold and they walked on silently.
He opened the door for her and she went in, shutting it behind her and leaving him outside. He felt not unlike a man in a dream who has looked on some familiar thing and seen it turn under his gaze into something different — something horrible.


They may have been raised as brothers, but Aythan and Eustace couldn’t be more different.

Aythan is brooding and earnest, while Eustace is charming but fickle. When their guardian, Matthew Bridges, is found dead, the cracks in their friendship begin to show.

Eustace’s good looks and carefree charms win him the heart of Matthew’s widow, Hester. Aythan, disgusted by their relationship and distrustful of Hester, is quick to leave his childhood home. But fate, determination, and the love of a certain young lady, call him back...

Aythan is determined to make his own way in the world but it seems like all he can make are enemies. First he is an enemy of Hester and Eustace, then of his new employer, then of the villagers. Fatefully, and finally, he is an enemy of the law...

Published in 1908 and set on the Welsh border, The History of Aythan Waring is a classic and with good reason. Gripping and full of style, it will keep you reading late into the night.

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All the Ugly and Wonderful Things: A Novel

by Bryn Greenwood

 

A beautiful and provocative love story between two unlikely people and the hard-won relationship that elevates them above the Midwestern meth lab backdrop of their lives.

As the daughter of a drug dealer, Wavy knows not to trust people, not even her own parents. It's safer to keep her mouth shut and stay out of sight. Struggling to raise her little brother, Donal, eight-year-old Wavy is the only responsible adult around. Obsessed with the constellations, she finds peace in the starry night sky above the fields behind her house, until one night her star gazing causes an accident. After witnessing his motorcycle wreck, she forms an unusual friendship with one of her father's thugs, Kellen, a tattooed ex-con with a heart of gold.

By the time Wavy is a teenager, her relationship with Kellen is the only tender thing in a brutal world of addicts and debauchery. When tragedy rips Wavy's family apart, a well-meaning aunt steps in, and what is beautiful to Wavy looks ugly under the scrutiny of the outside world. A powerful novel you won’t soon forget, Bryn Greenwood's All the Ugly and Wonderful Things challenges all we know and believe about love.

 

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Before We Were Yours: A Novel

by Lisa Wingate

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • For readers of Orphan Train and The Nightingale comes a “thought-provoking [and] complex tale about two families, two generations apart . . . based on a notorious true-life scandal.”*

Memphis, 1939. Twelve-year-old Rill Foss and her four younger siblings live a magical life aboard their family’s Mississippi River shantyboat. But when their father must rush their mother to the hospital one stormy night, Rill is left in charge—until strangers arrive in force. Wrenched from all that is familiar and thrown into a Tennessee Children’s Home Society orphanage, the Foss children are assured that they will soon be returned to their parents—but they quickly realize the dark truth. At the mercy of the facility’s cruel director, Rill fights to keep her sisters and brother together in a world of danger and uncertainty.

Aiken, South Carolina, present day. Born into wealth and privilege, Avery Stafford seems to have it all: a successful career as a federal prosecutor, a handsome fiancé, and a lavish wedding on the horizon. But when Avery returns home to help her father weather a health crisis, a chance encounter leaves her with uncomfortable questions and compels her to take a journey through her family’s long-hidden history, on a path that will ultimately lead either to devastation or to redemption.

Based on one of America’s most notorious real-life scandals—in which Georgia Tann, director of a Memphis-based adoption organization, kidnapped and sold poor children to wealthy families all over the country—Lisa Wingate’s riveting, wrenching, and ultimately uplifting tale reminds us how, even though the paths we take can lead to many places, the heart never forgets where we belong.

*Library Journal

Praise for Before We Were Yours

“A [story] of a family lost and found . . . a poignant, engrossing tale about sibling love and the toll of secrets.”People

“Sure to be one of the most compelling books you pick up this year. . . . Wingate is a master-storyteller, and you’ll find yourself pulled along as she reveals the wake of terror and heartache that is Georgia Tann’s legacy.”Parade

“One of the year’s best books . . . It is impossible not to get swept up in this near-perfect novel.”The Huffington Post

“Lisa Wingate takes an almost unthinkable chapter in our nation’s history and weaves a tale of enduring power.”—Paula McLain, New York Times bestselling author of Circling the Sun

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The Hideaway

by Lauren K. Denton


When her grandmother’s will wrenches Sara back home, she learns more about Margaret Van Buren in the wake of her death than she ever knew in life.

After her last remaining family member dies, Sara Jenkins goes home to The Hideaway, her grandmother Mags’s ramshackle B&B in Sweet Bay, Alabama. She intends to quickly tie up loose ends then return to her busy life and thriving antique shop in New Orleans. Instead, she learns Mags has willed The Hideaway to her and charged her with renovating it—no small task considering her grandmother’s best friends, a motley crew of senior citizens, still live there.

Rather than hurrying back to New Orleans, Sara stays in Sweet Bay and begins the biggest house-rehabbing project of her career. Amid drywall dust, old memories, and a charming contractor, she discovers that slipping back into life at The Hideaway is easier than she expected.

Then she discovers a box Mags left in the attic with clues to a life Sara never imagined for her grandmother. With help from Mags’s friends, Sara begins to piece together the mysterious life of bravery, passion, and choices that changed her grandmother’s destiny in both marvelous and devastating ways.

When an opportunistic land developer threatens to seize The Hideaway, Sara is forced to make a choice—stay in Sweet Bay and fight for the house and the people she’s grown to love or leave again and return to her successful but solitary life in New Orleans.

“Two endearing heroines and their poignant storylines of love lost and found make this the perfect book for an afternoon on the back porch with a glass of sweet tea.” —Karen White, New York Times bestselling author

 

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The Best Of The Strand Magazine

by Andrew Roberts et al


"A monthly magazine costing sixpence but worth a shilling."

For 60 years The Strand Magazine showcased the best writers in England and America.

The magazine did not just reflect the age, it shaped it.

It was a popular publication for the best in fiction, featuring works by some of the greatest authors of the 19th and 20th centuries, including Rudyard Kipling, Leo Tolstoy, Agatha Christie and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, as well as European writers such as Victor Hugo and Lermontov.

Conan Doyle was to prove one of the Strand’s most prolific authors -- his Sherlock Holmes stories propelled him to fame.

But The Strand was not just Holmes.

It published many brilliant stories and essays, some by authors that are still famous, others by writers waiting to be re-discovered by a new generation of readers.

'The Best of The Strand' is a carefully edited selection of some of the finest work to appear in the magazine.

The first collection of includes 13 fiction and non-fiction pieces:

The Story of the Strand
The Adventure of the Silver Blaze by Arthur Conan Doyle
The Queer Side of Life: The Story of the King’s Idea
Illustrated Interviews: William Howard Russel
A Night in an Opium Den
Athletes of the Year: Their Performances and Methods of Training
“Author! Author!” by E.W. Hornung
Celebrities At Play
The Charge of the Light Brigade by Private James Lamb
Crime and Criminals
Some Curious Public School Customs
Stories from the Diary of a Doctor
The Lost Legion by Rudyard Kipling

The aim, like that if the original magazine, is to inform and entertain.

The collection is introduced by historian Andrew Roberts, explaining The Strand's significance and its enduring legacy.

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The Daisy Rock

by Eva Hanagan

“They saw him flung clear of the waves almost upon the rocks and twice the sea snatched him back. It seemed to play with him like an angler with a fish on the line; and, like a hooked fish, Fergus was tiring…”

When Fergus saved his sister, Stella, from drowning in Tangie Bay, it should have been a triumph.

But now that Stella is head of her own company, Fergus seems to have festered in his retirement, growing more and more resentful, caring only for his fish.

His wife, Flora, can feel him slipping away. Flora views her husband’s inadequacies with wry tolerance and occasional despair and it and doesn’t help that their ghastly neighbours, Eleanor and Letty, keep calling at all hours and indulging Fergus’s drinking habit.

Now that Stella is visiting again, Flora is hoping for brother and sister to reconcile, for another miracle.

But it doesn’t look like she will get it.

If anything, Fergus and Stella seem to be dragging each other down.

Hoping to escape, Fergus and Flora take their fateful trip to Tangie Bay...

A delicately crafted tragicomedy, The Daisy Rock is a book that refuses to let you go.
 

Praise for Eva Hanagan

 


‘Eva Hanagan tells a story of supernatural evil with such quiet conviction and sets it in such pleasing rural domesticity that its full force only slowly pervades the reader’s consciousness. When it does it is absolute …’ - Shirley Toulson, British Book News

‘Eva Hanagan writes with an easy and natural grace which gives to the life of her recluse an evocative, unforced descriptiveness of an impressive order.’ - Derek Stanford, Scotsman

‘Mrs Hanagan is good at uneasy states of mind and feelings, and very good at the temptations of suicide … an accomplished beginning.’ - Robert Nye, - Guardian

‘Between the covers of this book is a really thrilling story … It should restore to many a reader his faith in the pleasure of reading for reading’s sake.’ - West Sussex County Times

‘ … so beautifully and precisely visualised that I too was enthralled … a delicious piece of water-colour Gothic.’ - Michael Maxwell-Scott, Daily Telegraph


Eva Hanagan was a Scottish author, who died at the age of 85, in 2009. During a Foreign Office posting to Vienna after the Second World War, Hanagan met her husband, with whom she had two sons. She published her first novel, In Thrall, in 1977. Following which, there was a fairly rapid succession of novels: Playmates (1978), and A Knock at the Door (1982). She settled in Sussex, from where she authored her novels.

 

 

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The Queen's Mary

by Sarah Gristwood

'If you read one historical novel this year, make it THE QUEEN'S MARY by Sarah Gristwood. It's a superb fictional rendering of a difficult subject. I could not put it down.' - bestselling author Alison Weir

Mary Seton is lady-in-waiting to the legendary Mary Queen of Scots.

Torn between her own desires and her duty to serve her mistress, she is ultimately drawn into her Queen's web of passion and royal treachery - and must play her part in the game of thrones between Mary and Elizabeth I.

Must she choose between survival, and sharing the same fate as the woman she has served, loyally and lovingly, since a child?

The Queen's Mary is an engaging and insightful novel, which allows the reader to peek behind the curtain of history - and see into the heart and mind of a forgotten woman who helped shape the Tudor era.

Fans of Phillipa Gregory, Alison Weir and The Tudors will love The Queen’s Mary.

 

Praise for The Queen’s Mary

'Sarah Gristwood breathes new life into the deeply tragic story of Mary Queen of Scots by telling it through the perspective of the invisible woman who sacrificed her life to serve her.' Elizabeth Freemantle, bestselling author of The Girl in the Glass Tower

 

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Slaughterhouse-Five

by Kurt Vonnegut

Adapted for a magnificent George Roy Hill film three years later (perhaps the only film adaptation of a masterpiece which exceeds its source), Slaughterhouse-Five (1969) is the now famous parable of Billy Pilgrim, a World War II veteran and POW, who has in the later stage of his life become "unstuck in time" and who experiences at will (or unwillingly) all known events of his chronology out of order and sometimes simultaneously.

Traumatized by the bombing of Dresden at the time he had been imprisoned, Pilgrim drifts through all events and history, sometimes deeply implicated, sometimes a witness. He is surrounded by Vonnegut's usual large cast of continuing characters (notably here the hack science fiction writer Kilgore Trout and the alien Tralmafadorians who oversee his life and remind him constantly that there is no causation, no order, no motive to existence).

The "unstuck" nature of Pilgrim's experience may constitute an early novelistic use of what we now call Post Traumatic Stress Disorder; then again, Pilgrim's aliens may be as "real" as Dresden is real to him. Struggling to find some purpose, order or meaning to his existence and humanity's, Pilgrim meets the beauteous and mysterious Montana Wildhack (certainly the author's best character name), has a child with her and drifts on some supernal plane, finally, in which Kilgore Trout, the Tralmafadorians, Montana Wildhack and the ruins of Dresden do not merge but rather disperse through all planes of existence.

Slaughterhouse-Five was hugely successful, brought Vonnegut an enormous audience, was a finalist for the National Book Award and a bestseller and remains four decades later as timeless and shattering a war fiction as Catch-22, with which it stands as the two signal novels of their riotous and furious decade.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kurt Vonnegut (1922-2007) is one of the most beloved American writers of the twentieth century. Vonnegut's audience increased steadily since his first five pieces in the 1950s and grew from there. His 1968 novel Slaughterhouse-Five has become a canonic war novel with Joseph Heller's Catch-22 to form the truest and darkest of what came from World War II.

Vonnegut began his career as a science fiction writer, and his early novels--Player Piano and The Sirens of Titan--were categorized as such even as they appealed to an audience far beyond the reach of the category. In the 1960s, Vonnegut became closely associated with the Baby Boomer generation, a writer on that side, so to speak.

Now that Vonnegut's work has been studied as a large body of work, it has been more deeply understood and unified. There is a consistency to his satirical insight, humor and anger which makes his work so synergistic. It seems clear that the more of Vonnegut's work you read, the more it resonates and the more you wish to read. Scholars believe that Vonnegut's reputation (like Mark Twain's) will grow steadily through the decades as his work continues to increase in relevance and new connections are formed, new insights made.

ABOUT THE SERIES

Author Kurt Vonnegut is considered by most to be one of the most important writers of the twentieth century. His books Slaughterhouse-Five (named after Vonnegut's World War II POW experience) and Cat's Cradle are considered among his top works. RosettaBooks offers here a complete range of Vonnegut's work, including his first novel (Player Piano, 1952) for readers familiar with Vonnegut's work as well as newcomers.

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How To Push Through (The Heart Beneath Quartet Book 4)

by Carey Harrison

‘Audacious and spectacular’ -The Times

Every single one of us contains landscapes and characters, no matter if they’re real or imaginary, that no one, no partner, no lover, friend or even psychic can ever hope to see…


Anna Maria von Doderer is waiting. Waiting for a therapy patient she hasn’t seen for many years. She has to tell her about her diagnosis all that time ago. That she’d got it all wrong.

Chrissie knows she must meet the “Dod” and is apprehensive. Will Anna-Maria be able to see straight through her? But the news she now brings can only be told face to face.

The news about Egon.

Egon, the wild child of the woods, abandoned by his mother in a desperate bid for survival during the second world war.

Egon, who, in total innocence, has drawn so many lives together in a complex tapestry, with both miraculous and disastrous outcomes.

Margot, ex-Hollywood stand-in, British secret agent in the war and survivor of the Russian Gulags (labour camps), knows she is dying and looks back on her life; and the one pressing question: should she finally reveal the secret that she has been holding for the past forty years?

Told in their own voices, this story of fantastic coincidence and tragic consequence explores the human spirit; it’s amazing strengths and fatal weaknesses. It is indeed a glorious journey through many landscapes, both in the real world and of the mind.

How To Push Through is the fourth and final book of Carey Harrison’s The Heart Beneath Quartet, following Richard’s Feet, Cley and Egon.
Carey Harrison was born in Britain and raised in the United States where he has spent the majority of his working life. He began as a stage playwright, completing 42 plays for the stage and forty plays for BBC radio. He is also an actor, teach and novelist and was described in the Dublin Evening News as ‘one of the most accomplished writers of our time’. He lives in Woodstock, New York.

 

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A Sky Full of Stars

by Melissa Josias

South African Abernathy Jones has thought a lot about dying…

At 20 years old, she has no desire for a long life. In the past year, she’s become quite adept at fantasising about how she’ll go; jumping off a building, swallowing a handful of pills, flinging herself off a bridge into oncoming traffic.

So when she finds herself on the verge of unconsciousness in the middle of a car wreck somewhere in southern California, she doesn’t think it’s a bad way to go.

Except for the fact that she’s not alone in that car.

There’s someone else bleeding next to her, and it’s not looking good for either of them.

There was a plan for dying, sure, but not one that included another person. Especially not someone she might be in love with.
Seemingly on the verge of something she’s desired for so long, Abby is confronted with a decision.

Live or die. Give up or fight on.

Simple enough, right?

Especially when you thought the choice was already made…

Reaching across the globe from Cape Town to California, A Sky Full of Stars is a story about despair, friendship, hope, love and being brave.

Melissa Josias is a young writer from Cape Town, South Africa. A self-proclaimed book nerd, she also loves avocados and thinks whales are cool. When she’s not writing or devouring ridiculous amounts of books, she’s daydreaming of faraway places that look good on postcards. When she’s not doing that, she is fervently busy writing her next novel.

 

 

 

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A Season of Secrets: A Feel-Good Holiday Story

by Anneke Campbell

PREGNANT VIRGIN WALKS INTO A TOWN...THE WEEK BEFORE CHRISTMAS!

"Expect the unexpected! ... A story with an intriguing premise, an author with a great witty voice, and characters that are well developed..." – Storm Goddess Book Reviews


A literary twist on the traditional Christmas story, A SEASON OF SECRETS is the perfect winter read for fans of Barbara Kingsolver, LOVE, ACTUALLY, and THE FAMILY STONE.

There's Something About Mary—something noticeable—that baby bump she’s sporting. And something no one could ever guess—her prenatal exam shows she’s never had sex. Which really puts tiny Bellingham, Indiana on the map! And thereon hangs the real tale—a funny, warm, surprising one.

Mary’s got her own secrets—lots of them. But so does everyone else in Bellingham. Violet the waitress wants something badly! Dr. Bob has big plans. Joe the Postman has regrets. Cammy has a secret love. And Ted may not be quite as godly as he’d like people to think.

The varied ways the townsfolk welcome this waif from nowhere, enfolding her into their hearts and lives despite the air of mystery and strangeness surrounding her (not to mention the TV cameras and paparazzi), is one part heartwarming, one part laugh-out-loud funny.

WHO WILL LIKE IT: Sophisticated readers who like their Christmas goodies a little bit tart and a little sweet--like lemon bars or cranberry shortbread; who prefer LOVE, ACTUALLY to A CHRISTMAS CAROL; who'd like to leave the true meaning of Christmas a little bit mysterious--and possibly open to miracles.

WHO WILL BE OFFENDED: No one! It isn't anti-religious or anti-Christian or anti-Christmas. But it isn't religious either. Whether you're Baptist, or Pagan or Jewish or atheist, it's guaranteed not to offend your sensibilities! Because it's not about religion any more than BAD SANTA is. Although it may poke gentle fun at some of our more materialistic traditions, it's a good-hearted tale that's all about hope. It might even make you feel festive!
 

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Milk and Honey

by Rupi Kaur

The book is divided into four chapters, and each chapter serves a different purpose. Deals with a different pain. Heals a different heartache. Milk and Honey takes readers through a journey of the most bitter moments in life and finds sweetness in them because there is sweetness everywhere if you are just willing to look.

 

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Loteria: A Novel (P.S.)

by Mario Alberto Zambrano

 

In Lotería, the spellbinding literary debut by Mario Alberto Zambrano, a young girl tells the story of her family’s tragic demise using a deck of cards of the eponymous Latin American game of chance.
 
With her older sister Estrella in the ICU and her father in jail, eleven-year-old Luz Castillo has been taken into the custody of the state. Alone in her room, she retreats behind a wall of silence, writing in her journal and shuffling through a deck of lotería cards. Each of the cards’ colorful images—mermaids, bottles, spiders, death, and stars—sparks a random memory.
 
Pieced together, these snapshots bring into focus the joy and pain of the young girl’s life, and the events that led to her present situation. But just as the story becomes clear, a breathtaking twist changes everything.

Beautiful full-color images of lotería cards are featured throughout this intricate and haunting novel.

 

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Charmer Boy Gypsy Girl

by Victor Harrington

The essence and meaning of transcendent love between two people—the kernel of human existence—is often found in the crucible of war. Such was the love between Bosko, a Serbian boy, and Admira, a Bosnian girl, who were caught in one of the most barbaric and brutal periods of the last century: the breakup of Yugoslavia.

The true story of Bosko and Admira captured the world’s attention, and the couple was embraced as the Romeo and Juliet of war-torn Sarajevo.

They would not be parted, even as they lived like animals among the dead and the dying; even as they hid from those who sought to destroy them. Bosko would not leave Admira when he had the chance. Admira risked her life so that they would never be separated. Caught in the maelstrom of a war, they lived their lives with passion and unbounded love for each other.

This novel is a fictionalized account of their love story.

In Sarajevo, where there was peace within despair and love amongst the hate on the blood-soaked sidewalks and ancient walls, it is said by some that you can still hear the whisper of these two lovers:

"Was there a time my love when we were not together."
"Never…never a time we shall not be together."

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Upon Several Occasions

by Elizabeth Berridge

Mady Barnard is a thirty-three year old unmarried woman, who still lives with her mother…

However, it cannot go unnoticed that “Bad luck’s been on her even since she was born” .

Ever since then, her difficulties, combined with her unfriendly temperament, have become a favourite topic of conversation in the local community…

The Women’s League, in particular, can’t stop discussing Mady’s life, with their enthusiastic gossiping over regular cups of tea making it all too-clear that traditional village life is full of secrets and rumours.

But then a trip to Bristow results in an unlikely relationship forming between Mady and a local Welshman and no one is quite sure what the future has in store for them…

And soon flooding and forest fires disrupt family harmony and despite everything, the idea of community has never felt so strong, or as necessary.

Empathy and grievance are combined as each family tells of their distressing events and before long, marriage, birth and death connect them together.

Upon Several Occasions is an emotional literary tale, full of lively characters and creates a portrait of a community bound together.

Elizabeth Berridge (December 1919 – December 2009) was a novelist and critic. Born in London, where she was partly educated here, she later moved to Geneva. Berridge won the Yorkshire Post Novel of the Year Award, in 1964 for Across The Common.

 

 

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